spanishbaroqueart:

SAINTS & FASHION

Bernardino de Villegas, Jesuit priest, against the Baroque depiction of virgin martyrs and saints in the arts - 1625 text (vs.) Francisco de Zurbarán's series of paintings of female saints:

"Is there anything more indecent than those virginal saints dressed in such profane attire, with so many pendants and such finery, that not even the wealthiest ladies wear? Sometimes, even a man might doubt whether to worship them as St. Lucy, or St. Catherine, or to glance away to avoid seeing the profanity of their garments, given that with their dresses and ornaments they do not seem heavenly saints, but earthly ladies. St. Catherine is not shown sword in hand, nor St. Lucy with her eyes on a plate, so nobody would say they could be saints, nor the most honest virgins, according to their gowns and garments in which they have been dressed."

Original text: “¿Qué cosa más indecente que (…) unas santas vírgenes vestidas tan profanamente, y con tantos dijes y galas, que no traen mas las damas más bizarras del mundo? Que a veces duda un hombre, si las adorará por santa Lucía, o santa Catalina, o si apartará los ojos por no ver la profanidad de sus trajes: porque en sus vestidos y adornos no parecen santas del cielo, sino damas del mundo. Y a no estar santa Catalina con sus espada en la mano, y santa Lucía con sus ojos en el plato, por lo que toca al vestido y traje galán con que las visten, nadie dijera que eran santas, ni vírgenes honestísimas, como lo fueron.”

(Source: Bernardino de Villegas, "La esposa de Christo: Instruida con la vida de Santa Lutgarda virgen, Monja de S. Bernardo" (1625). Libro Quarto - Cap. XVIII - p. 530)

spanishbaroqueart:

Cristóbal BALENCIAGA 1951 and 1961 haute couture designs, inspired by Zurbarán’s female saints and their luxurious costumes.

'The Art of Balenciaga' exhibition / (source

spanishbaroqueart:

Michael Thompson, Carmen Kass · Divine Inspiration, Vogue June 2000

Francisco de Zurbarán, Saint Elizabeth of Portugal, c. 1635 (Museo del Prado, Madrid)

spanishbaroqueart:

Francisco de Zurbarán

Saint Catherine of Alexandria, c. 1635-40

Colección Masaveu, Spain

spanishbaroqueart:

Francisco de Zurbarán

Saint Euphemia, c. 1637

Museo del Prado, Madrid, Spain

"Probably for use in home worship, this work belongs to a very characteristic type of paintings by Zurbarán. Young and delicate women saints are portrayed with their traditional attributes, standing out over a dark background that emphasizes the delicacy of their features and gestures. In many cases these were “portraits in the divine manner”, in which the facial features of the person who commissioned the work were represented in the personage of the saint." (+)

spanishbaroqueart:

Francisco de Zurbarán

Saints Justa and Rufina, c. 1630s

Kingston Lacy Estate, Dorset / National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin

Justa and Rufina, patron saints of the city of Seville, were daughters of a potter, and both were martyred for refusing to allow their father’s vessels to be used in the worship of Venus and destroying the image of the goddess in the temple.

spanishbaroqueart:

Francisco de Zurbarán (Studio of)

Saint Rufina

The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge, UK

St. Rufina holds the earthenware which she and St. Justa (patron saints of Seville) sold to support themselves before their martyrdom on the rack.

spanishbaroqueart:

Francisco de Zurbarán

Saint Apollonia, 1636

Musée du Louvre, Paris

Saint Apollonia was one of the young virgins who suffered martyrdom in Alexandria during a local uprising against the Christians prior to the persecution of Decius (c. 249 AD). According to legend, her torture included having all of her teeth violently pulled out or shattered. Zurbarán’s portrayal includes the instrument of her torture. The saint holds the martyr’s palm in one hand and a tooth gripped by a pair of pliers in the other. 

spanishbaroqueart:

ERWIN OLAF + ZURBARÁN

· Erwin Olaf, Apolonia, 2008, from the series Laboral Escena Gijon

· Francisco de Zurbarán, Saint Apollonia, 1636 (Musée du Louvre)

spanishbaroqueart:

Francisco de Zurbarán

Saint Euphemia, 1637

Palazzo Bianco (Musei di Strada Nuova), Genova

Euphemia bears a large saw as a symbol of her martyrdom.

spanishbaroqueart:

Francisco de Zurbarán

Saint Ursula, c. 1641-58

Palazzo Bianco (Musei di Strada Nuova), Genova

le-plus-beau-des-mensonges:

Gustav Klimt and Emilie Flöge on Lake Attersee, 1913

Photographer: Friedrich G. Walker (Autochrome Lumière Plate)

* Only color photograph of Gustav Klimt that has been passed down to us.

EL GRECO · In Search of Abstraction

Photographs by Bernardo Pérez ("El Greco de cerca")

spanishbaroqueart:

Francisco de Zurbarán

Saint Margaret of Antioch, c. 1631-40

National Gallery, London

spanishbaroqueart:

CARAVAGGIO IN SPAIN !

Happy Birthday to Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, born on this day in 1571.

1. Saint Catherine of Alexandria, c. 1598

(Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

2. David Victorious over Goliath, c. 1600

(Museo del Prado, Madrid)

3. Saint Jerome in Meditation, c. 1605

(Santa Maria de Montserrat, Barcelona)

4. Saint John the Baptist, c. 1597-98

(Museo Tesoro Catedralicio, Toledo)

5. Salome with the Head of John the Baptist, c. 1609

(Palacio Real de Madrid)

* Caravaggio became one of the greatest influences on Spanish Baroque painting. His legacy can be appreciated in Spanish artists such as Juan Bautista Maíno, Francisco Ribalta, José de Ribera, Pedro Núñez del Valle, and Francisco de Zurbarán, to name a few.